Added sugar: where is it hidden and how much is safe for health
We often hear that sugar is good for the brain, that it’s hard to live without sugar, and so on. Most often I come across such statements from representatives of…

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Adyghe salt - a unique seasoning
Among the traditional dishes of Adygea there are many useful and at the same time simple dishes that, with constant use, carry a lot of useful properties. It is this…

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Beans: The Food of the Future
Legumes - beans, peas, chickpeas, lentils - the cornerstone of any healthy diet. They have unique properties, such as anti-cancer (for more information about the benefits of beans, I talk…

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catechins and vanilloids

Excess fructose harms the liver as does alcohol abuse

Scientists are finding new evidence that one of the most common types of sugar, fructose, can be toxic to the liver like alcohol.

For most people, fructose in its natural state – in the fruits of fruits – does not pose any harm. A unique feature of fructose is that it is processed in the liver, for which there is no problem to cope with a small amount of this sugar, which is ingested slowly. Take, for example, an apple: it takes a lot of time to chew it, and the dietary fiber contained in the apple slows down its processing in the intestines.

But today, manufacturers are increasingly adding fructose to foods in a highly concentrated form. To do this, they extract it from corn, beets and sugarcane, during which it loses its original nutrients and fiber. Frequent use of large doses of fructose during the day, without fibers that slow down its absorption, forces our body to process such an amount of this sugar that it is not suitable for. In almost all sugar-added foods, fructose levels are extremely high. Continue reading

What starch reduces the risk of bowel cancer and how to increase its presence in your diet

For a long time, scientists believed that any starch is digested by digestive enzymes in the small intestine. Until 1982, resistant starch was discovered. It turned out that this type of starch is resistant to digestion: it lingers in the large intestine and serves there as food for friendly microflora along with fiber. As a result, resistant starch:

softens and “fills” the chair,
reduces the risk of colon cancer,
enhances the production of short chain fatty acids and creates a more alkaline environment in the intestine,
reduces the amount of rotting products resulting from protein fermentation,
reduces the amount of secondary bile products.
Resistant starch is found in many common foods, including cereals, vegetables, legumes, seeds, and some nuts, but its proportion there does not exceed a few percent. (Legumes are the best source; they contain 4–5% resistant starch and higher). Here are some ways to get an extra dose of this starch: Continue reading

Why do we need beets and what to cook from it

Beetroot for us – so familiar, so “own”. In fact, several millennia before us, its healing properties and taste (especially beet tops!) Were the first to be appreciated by the Persians and the ancient Romans. Beet “sailed” to the Principality of Kiev from Byzantium in about the X-XI centuries, and then spread to the north, in the lands of Vladimir, Suzdal, Novgorod. For four centuries, by the XIV century, it gained popularity among our ancestors: numerous records speak about this, for example, in shop books and receipts and consumables of monasteries. What did you do with beets? It was baked in an oven and served for tea. They ate, sliced ​​in circles with ginger, before dinner, and the tops were added to soups. And, of course, cooked borscht, references to which date back to the 16th century. And already in the 20th century, beets became space food: in 1975, during the Apollo Soyuz test project, Soviet cosmonauts treated American astronauts in orbit with beetroot soup made of tubes.

For me, beets are truly “cosmic” food due to its amazing beneficial properties!

I love beets since childhood, especially as part of the borscht that my grandmother cooked, and vinaigrette – the only Soviet salad that I could eat, since everyone else was generously seasoned with my hateful mayonnaise. Both recipes (borsch and vinaigrette) are in the Live up! recipes. Continue reading

Great Lent: Five Major Misconceptions
Orthodox Monday begins Lent. Every year it is accompanied by numerous disputes about what can and cannot be eaten, how to dress, and so on. Strictly according to the charter…

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10 rules for a perfect salad
Many are sure that the salad is just the decoration of the main dish. In fact, it is itself a full-fledged dish, and not just a handful of leaves on…

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How can your pizza make the world a better place?
According to studies, we spend from 30 to 50% of our family budget only on food, and in half the cases we eat out. As food consumers, we are a…

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The most important thing about what superfoods are and what they are
You have repeatedly heard that some products are called superfoods. But what exactly does this mean? Which products can be included in this honorable list? And why aren't they really…

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