Added sugar: where is it hidden and how much is safe for health
We often hear that sugar is good for the brain, that it’s hard to live without sugar, and so on. Most often I come across such statements from representatives of…

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Beans: The Food of the Future
Legumes - beans, peas, chickpeas, lentils - the cornerstone of any healthy diet. They have unique properties, such as anti-cancer (for more information about the benefits of beans, I talk…

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What foods really improve intestinal microflora?
Microbiome - a community of diverse bacteria that live in our intestines - has long been a hot issue of a healthy lifestyle. I am very interested in this topic…

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realize that these delicious

Chia seeds: with what and why eat them?

Chia seeds are rapidly spreading and gaining popularity among adherents of a healthy diet. But many, standing in front of a supermarket shelf with this rather rare product, will think about whether to take it? Why are these outlandish seeds so useful and, most importantly, how to cook them? Let’s get it right.

The seeds of this plant of the sage genus came to us from Central America. In 2005, the European Union recognized chia seeds as a “promising food.” Yes, this food is really very promising. Especially when you consider that only two tablespoons of these seeds – and this is enough to cook such a delicious and refreshing raspberry “jam” – contain at their 140 kilocalories as much as 5 grams of protein and 10 grams of fiber. And do not be afraid of 9 grams of fat contained in this portion. After all, most of it falls on essential fatty acids: a couple of tablespoons of chia seeds will more than provide you with the daily norm of alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3) and about one sixth of the norm of linoleic (omega-6) fatty acids. Continue reading

Excess fructose harms the liver as does alcohol abuse
Scientists are finding new evidence that one of the most common types of sugar, fructose, can be toxic to the liver like alcohol. For most people, fructose in its natural…

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From every little thing - a hungry pie
The etymology of the word "pie" is ambiguous. Some scientists believe that it came from the Old Slavonic “feast”. According to others, the word was formed from the old Russian…

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Can a child be a vegetarian?
As part of preparing material about vegetarian children, the editors of the Live portal invited me to answer several questions that often confused parents. Here is what I said. Live:…

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How can your pizza make the world a better place?
According to studies, we spend from 30 to 50% of our family budget only on food, and in half the cases we eat out. As food consumers, we are a…

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