Great Lent: Five Major Misconceptions
Orthodox Monday begins Lent. Every year it is accompanied by numerous disputes about what can and cannot be eaten, how to dress, and so on. Strictly according to the charter…

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Chia seeds: with what and why eat them?
Chia seeds are rapidly spreading and gaining popularity among adherents of a healthy diet. But many, standing in front of a supermarket shelf with this rather rare product, will think…

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The most unexpected sources of fiber
Fiber is an essential part of any healthy diet. Its benefits for our body are enormous - from the formation of intestinal microflora to lower cholesterol and prevent strokes. But…

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your hips

Excess fructose harms the liver as does alcohol abuse

Scientists are finding new evidence that one of the most common types of sugar, fructose, can be toxic to the liver like alcohol.

For most people, fructose in its natural state – in the fruits of fruits – does not pose any harm. A unique feature of fructose is that it is processed in the liver, for which there is no problem to cope with a small amount of this sugar, which is ingested slowly. Take, for example, an apple: it takes a lot of time to chew it, and the dietary fiber contained in the apple slows down its processing in the intestines.

But today, manufacturers are increasingly adding fructose to foods in a highly concentrated form. To do this, they extract it from corn, beets and sugarcane, during which it loses its original nutrients and fiber. Frequent use of large doses of fructose during the day, without fibers that slow down its absorption, forces our body to process such an amount of this sugar that it is not suitable for. In almost all sugar-added foods, fructose levels are extremely high. Continue reading

20 eating habits for a long and healthy life
For more than ten years, Dan Buttner, a traveler and author of the book “Rules of Longevity”, about which I wrote, together with a team of experts, has been studying…

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From every little thing - a hungry pie
The etymology of the word "pie" is ambiguous. Some scientists believe that it came from the Old Slavonic “feast”. According to others, the word was formed from the old Russian…

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How to choose and cook Chinese leafy vegetables
For two years now I have been living in Singapore, and although the life of expats here is quite isolated, you can learn a lot about the local traditions, culture…

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Added sugar: where is it hidden and how much is safe for health
We often hear that sugar is good for the brain, that it’s hard to live without sugar, and so on. Most often I come across such statements from representatives of…

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